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Split Green Pea “Soup” {Potaje de Chícharo} Franco-Cuban Style

Chicharo1 Split Green Pea Soup {Potaje de Chícharo} Franco Cuban Style

 Of all the beans, peas and legumes known to this world, split green peas are my favorite. There is no potaje de anything that makes me happier than this green one right here. I’ve been enjoying it since I was a little girl and seem to grow fonder of it as I get older. But I won’t make it all that often at all. I leave cooking and its serving to Mami. She is the expert from start to finish and so why bother messing with something when it’s perfect. I tell no lie. 

Very funny, but sadly very true story about chícharos, as Cubans call it.  My father was a diplomat translator in Cuba for many years. Some time before I was born, he was hosting a lot of French diplomats and businessmen coming to the forbidden island. He speaks a beautiful Parisien French. So, while those romantic, I’ll-do-anything-to impress-you days with my mother, he took her out to eat at a quasi fancy restaurant in Havana. As my father would have it, he put his best face forward, popped his collar and ordered in French. Apparently the restaurant had some French connections and some menu items were inspired as such. He ordered “Purée St. Germain.” Mami was all excited and asked him what it was. “No se, vamos haber,” he replies. The server, a young Cuban guy asks my dad if he was sure he wanted that. After a few confirmations and subtle suggestions he may not want that, the server obliged and placed my dad’s order of the really great sounding “Purée St. Germain.”

In high anticipation of some refined dish, Papi and Mami worked up an appetite. Out comes the server, places the bowl of the purée in front of both of them and my father, knowing how to quickly rebut says that he didn’t order chícharo, rather St. Germain. Well, you get it, right?! Purée St. Germain is French for chícharo! My father was embarrassed and Mami was all but upset, laughing at it all off and chalking it up to Cuba’s wanna be fancy appeal. The funny in this? This was 1973, I think, when very specific foods were being rationed to everyone. Split peas were one of them so my parents were up to their necks eating chícharos just about every day. Could you imagine going out for a lovely date with your new wife, you dress up the ordering process, trying to impress your beautiful spouse all to have dished out the same food you’ve been sick of eating for the last 6 months!

Gasp. What a disaster. It explains the servers insistence on my dad ordering something else off the menu. 

Chicharo2 Split Green Pea Soup {Potaje de Chícharo} Franco Cuban Style

No matter, they enjoyed the experience and never looked at split peas the same. In fact, I love their story so much, I appreciate my chicharos even more now. Like every other bean or pea typical of our diet, we eat this over rice.  But, when I’m “dieting” and needing to minimize my carb intake, I skip the rice and thin out the would be thick potaje so I can enjoy as a soup like bowl. Truthfully, I prefer it how we traditionally serve it. The consistency is nice and thick, making it a superb comfort food. But, even thinned out, the flavor is there and you’re not missing anything but the calories. 

I’ve seen many variations in split peas but I’ve not tried more than two others. One was an Indian version of dahl, using yellow split peas and the other was a Latin style one but no where similar to ours. Mami almost used calabaza and or white potatoes (which adds to the consistency) and a tender cut of beef, typically flank steak or a few bone-in short ribs. 

My trick in making chícharos is simple: pressure cook them. As a professional I wouldn’t suggest using that technique. Any pressure cooker manual will always list split peas as one of the few things you should never cook in it. Why? Because they literally split and become so “frothy,” potentially causing the valves to clog. Don’t want that ever. For the everyday home cook, I’d go for a traditional stock pot. You’d have to soak them overnight to loosen them. These little bits are hard! A basis sofrito will flavor them and the carne will complete the pow factor! 

I put my two sense in this last batch we made. I hawked the prep process and secured more more butternut squash than usual, replaced the potato with yuca and sautéed a mire poix instead of my traditional sofrito. Oh yes, I was loving it! Switching things up every now and then can prove to be super delicious! 

If interested, please email me for the original Cuban recipe I grew up on. This is one of those “classified” recipes I have on the cookbook docket…. yeah, that cookbook that’s been in the works for 3 years now. Oh joy. Soon. Very, very soon.  

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By Bren
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Comments

    In French Quebec split pea soup is a classic too. Great story with your parents.

    Joan just sent me your post when I told her I was making this soup and that the darn peas took so long to cook. We also call them chicharos. Mine looks a bit like yours…this is one of the most warming soups ever and your version is absolutely wonderful

    Nena Have a very Happy Thanksgiving with your familia.!

    Divina says:

    This looks amazing! Soup is something I love to eat but have a hard time cooking its either too thin or too thick.

    Jocelyn says:

    This soup looks so comforting. And while I usually am not a fan of split pea, this seriously has me intrigued.

    Digging split peas over here! A cooked up a recipe for the blog last year, and it was a winner. Your parents’ story is a funny little one to hold in your head each time you take a bite.

    jonathan says:

    I’ll take 2 orders please. Heat it up and ship it out!

    Evelyn Aponte says:

    Hello my name is EVelyn and I would love to try your pea soup. It truly looks amazing. Can you please email me the recipe . Thank you I tried to get the recipe but I guess it’s by email only. Thanks again. The pea soup is called chicharo soup

    Chef B says:

    Hi Evelyn: Thanks for stopping by! Nice to know you enjoyed the chicharo post. I’ll be happy to send you an email with the recipe. Do you by chance have a pressure cooker?

    natalia says:

    Hi Evelyn,
    Thank you so much for sharing your story with us as well as the soup recipe.

    This is the taste i am looking for. I had use pressure cooker for lentils n split peas..

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