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{All Around Latin America} A Breve History of Puerto Rican Piña Colada in Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

 Piña Colada Collage {All Around Latin America} A Breve History of Puerto Rican Piña Colada in Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

 You know there was a drink waiting to happen this week, right? I’ve actually been staying off the alcoholic beverages for a bit to see how much I can flatten my belly (just don’t judge if  you follow on Instagram and saw a devilish margarita recently). So, when Madelyn of Karma Free Cooking joined in this delicious story and food series, she was game to making a cocktail without the alcohol! I was tickled she was game for it. Plus, it aligned well her blogging and eating princples. 

Madelyn is joining us today from the lovely island of Puerto Rico where everything is breezy and sunny! Her recipe is a simple one but a true staple to our united cultures! Let’s welcome Madelyn back to Flanboyant Eats! B- 

FEHHMbadebloggers zps4d88c7c4 {All Around Latin America} A Breve History of Puerto Rican Piña Colada in Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

 

By Madelyn Rodriguez

I have to thank Bren for always extending me an invitation to get featured in her awesome blog…

She asked us to bring forth something that would represent my Hispanic roots to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month.  I could not think of a more iconic drink than the Piña Colada.  The Piña Colada has become the signature drink of the Caribbean, vacations and the beach.

According to the plaque, it was born on the streets of Old San Juan, on Calle Fortaleza.  But there are stories the piña colada was invented by a barman in the Caribe Hilton Hotel.  What I do like about both these stories – they both agree the Piña Colada is Puerto Rican.  No doubts about that… one of our many, many contributions to the world.  

I’ve seen many versions of this typical creamy beverage, but an authentic Piña Colada has merely 3 ingredients – crema de coco or cream of coconut, pineapple juice and ice.  You could add a little rum if you want, but the alcohol does not make the drink.  A virgin, karma-free version is equally as satisfying, if not more, in my humble opinion. 

This is a Piña Colada version that adults and kids alike can enjoy and feel as if they’re swept away into a beachy retreat… if at least for a few sips at a time.

Piña Colada 21 770x1276 {All Around Latin America} A Breve History of Puerto Rican Piña Colada in Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

images c/o Madelyn Rodriguez

CHECK BACK MONDAY  FOR A NEW FEATURED BLOGGER AND RECIPE  INSPIRED BY LATIN AMERICA! 

 *This is part of an annual Hispanic Heritage Month food series, now in its 2nd year. Catch up on this years and previous delicious features: 

{ALL AROUND LATIN AMERICA} FOOD SERIES

How do you celebrate this culturally inspiring month?

Follow the sexy and delicious fun on TWITTER | FACEBOOK | INSTAGRAM | GOOGLE +

 
follow on pinterest button {All Around Latin America} A Breve History of Puerto Rican Piña Colada in Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

VIRGIN PIÑA COLADA

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup of cream of coconut – I like Coco López
  • 1 cup of pineapple juice – I like Lotus
  • 6-8 ice cubes
  • Pineapple chunks and cherries for garnish

 Method:

Blend all the ingredients well in a blender.  The coconut cream will make the mixture frothy and creamy.  It will also provide all the sweetness you’ll need.

This recipe makes 4 drinks or 2 very large ones.

By Bren
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